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Innovation is at the heart of any great business. But how do you know which ideas are worth pursuing? These articles will show you how to harness creativity in your business and how to keep innovating and trying new things. You'll learn how to stop wasting time and why failure can be positive. 

Boost innovation by identifying your customers’ jobs to be done

Transform your offering by discovering why your customers make a purchase.

We know more about our customers than ever before. But this has led us down the wrong path when it comes to innovation, say Clayton M. Christensen, Taddy Hall, Karen Dillon and David S. Duncan in an article for Harvard Business Review.

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Why creativity and criticism complement each other

Your creative team need to be criticised, but not stifled – it’s a fine balancing act.

Some people believe that criticism and creativity make unhappy bedfellows in the workplace, but Theresa Johnston, writing for Stanford Business Journal, disagrees.

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How to achieve corporate longevity

The secret to staying the distance lies in your company’s ability to simultaneously exploit existing markets while exploring new ones.

When digital photography threatened celluloid film, Fujifilm managed this tricky balancing act while Kodak went bust.

Don’t leave your firm vulnerable to market disruption. Discover the the key to your firm’s long-term prosperity.

Five behaviours that create a culture of innovation

Inspire innovation by forging ahead on the path you want your employees to take.

Thriving in the face of industry disruption means creating a company culture that champions innovation. Start by changing your own habits and attitudes. Your employees will follow where you lead and the impact on company culture will be profound.

Here are five key behaviours that drive innovation....

Create your firm’s future today

What you do today determines your company’s future. The most successful firms learn to detect, analyse and capitalise on the earliest signs of emerging trends.

Writing for Harvard Business Review, Vijay Govindarajan describes how firms can master "planned opportunism" – a systematic process of detecting and interpreting the first signs of future developments in everything from customer...

Use your brand to attack new markets

Kuala Lumpur

Innovation isn’t just for startups – established companies can attack new markets too.

Incumbent firms operating in mature, saturated markets should use the power of their brands to tap the growth potential of new sectors, say Jean-Baptiste Coumau, Victor Fabius and Thomas Meyer writing for McKinsey Insights.

An algorithm for business success

Imagine an algorithm that could tell you when your company needs a new business model or when it should enter a new market.

The bad news? It doesn’t exist. The good news? Something almost as significant has emerged.

The lessons leaders everywhere can learn from Chinese companies

Chinese companies can teach the West responsiveness, flexibility, improvisation and speed, say Thomas Hout and David Michael, writing for the Harvard Business Review.

How to plan for the long term and the short term at the same time

Is it possible to invest in tomorrow without damaging performance today? Ken Favaro, writing for Strategy+Business, looks at short-term/long-term tension and how to get over it.

How to thrive in a slow-growth industry

Weak markets are not a valid excuse for a company’s slow growth, write Kasturi Rangan and Evan Hirsh for Strategy+Business. With the right market proposition, you can achieve success, no matter what state your industry is in.

Tips on selecting and trialling new management practices

Adopting a new management practice could give your company competitive edge and boost performance. But, warns Julian Birkinshaw, writing for Harvard Business Review, leaders should beware the “next big thing”.

Five ways to make your innovation initiatives successful

When innovation initiatives succeed, leaders immediately want more. While this is encouraging for innovation teams, it presents them with the dual challenge of scalability and funding.

Building your innovation team – the characters you need

As Amina Elahi points out, writing for the Chicago Tribune’s Blue Sky section, innovation doesn’t just happen – it’s created.

How to show your organisation is serious about innovation

You can’t achieve innovation through mission statements or press releases. Many leaders talk about the importance of innovation but are merely paying lip service to the concept.

Developing a strategy and mindset that encourages creative thinking takes concerted effort, observes Lisa Bodell, writing for Strategy+Business.

Dealing with creativity blockages

Creative work can take a long time, observes Jane Porter, writing for Fast Company. Results can be inconsistent, the gestation period can feel unproductive and it’s prone to blockages.

In fact, the challenging nature of creativity and the stagnation involved can tempt you into abandoning projects prematurely.

Using creativity to help your business stand out from the crowd

Creativity can be the key to catching customers, according to Daigo Smith, co-founder of UK online dating website Loveflutter, writing for The Guardian.

Smith summarises the company’s key learnings from the creative process that brought the site to life and “helped generate the industry buzz seen on both sides of the Atlantic”:

How to transform your employees into smart risk takers

Business leaders strive for positive cultural change and innovation, resulting in happy, fulfilled employees creating value throughout the organisation. Writing for Strategy+Business, Lisa Bodell observes that “the journey is just as critical as the destination” when a culture is being reshaped.

Is this the way to stop your organisation’s hierarchy killing innovative ideas?

Does the hierarchy of your organisation stifle innovation? That’s the question posed by David Burkus, writing for management website

Why innovation starts with your culture

There’s no doubt that innovation can be the difference between success and failure for a business. Writing for, Simon Mitchell insists that innovation and culture are two sides of the same coin, and the challenge is to foster an environment where people feel empowered to find a better way of doing things.

Want new ideas and solutions? Take an ‘outside-in’ view

You might want your organisation to be thought of as innovative, but simply asking your employees to think outside of the box won’t produce game-changing ideas, notes Lisa Bodell, writing for

How to use digital technology to improve the value of your business

Most of the talk regarding the potential of digital technology for business has been centred around online sales, social networking and mobile applications.

Could you save time and money by interviewing job candidates on the internet?

Jack Smith, Light and Sound, Flowers Gallery

Webcam job interviews are growing in popularity as companies cut back on recruiting budgets, writes Tara Weiss of

Even giant companies such as Nike and Cisco have used the internet to handle first and second round interviews.

Does what you produce matter less than the way you produce it?

Michael Kidner, Grey Column, Flowers Gallery

According to an 'Management Idea' article, because companies such as Wal-Mart, Dell and Toyota have managed to achieve extraordinary success while doing fairly ordinary things, many managers have realised that what they produce can be less important than the way they prod

Why do some companies innovate more successfully than others?

Michael Kidner, Colour Column, Flowers Gallery

Writing for Bloomberg Businessweek, Christine Crandell discusses why some companies successfully innovate and others don't.

Crandell argues that high rates of failure for new products – "once considered an inevitable cost of doing business" – are unacceptable in the modern business environment.


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