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Leadership

"Management is doing things right. Leadership is doing the right things." – Peter Drucker. We bring together the best leadership thinking from around the world. These leadership articles provide the knowledge and inspiration you need to be a great leader.

Eight things all great bosses believe

According to Geoffrey James, writing for Inc.com, the best and most respected managers tend to share certain core beliefs.

Seven ways to create a happy workforce

Two thirds of the world's employees feel disengaged in the workplace, write Peter Flade, James Harter and Jim Asplund for the HBR.org Blog Network. But there is a recipe for happy, spirited employees and it has seven essential ingredients.

The wisdom of Steve Jobs

On Business Insider, Dylan Love shares some innovation insight in the form of the most inspirational quotes from the late Apple co-founder and CEO Steve Jobs.

Here is a selection:

Growth opportunities: don’t overlook the low-hanging fruit

Leaders can miss growth opportunities because they are so far removed from the many day-to-day processes carried out in their organisations they lead, observe Jeremy Eden and Terri Long, writing for ChiefExecutive.net.

How to adjust your leadership mindset

Leadership is often thought of in terms of external characteristics, practices, behaviour and actions. However, this is only half the picture. Joanna Barsh and Johanne Lavoie, writing for McKinsey Insights, insist that leaders won’t reach their potential by only looking at what’s visible – they need to look at their own mindsets.

Mentoring: how to get the balance right

On Fast Company, Art Markman and Lolly Daskal discuss mentoring employees and striking the balance between developing their skills and allowing them to work autonomously.

The three key questions to ask recruitment firms

Writing for Forbes.com, Larry Myler observes that if a recruitment company can’t find, hire, develop and retain an extraordinary workforce for itself, it’s unlikely it will be able to help your company.

Myler suggests three key questions you should ask recruitment firms before choosing one to help build your workforce:

Why you can’t afford to ignore your ‘invisible’ employees

Writing for Harvard Business Review, David Zweig discusses a class of employees he calls “the invisibles”. These are extremely committed professionals capable of successful, high-profile careers but prefer to work away from the spotlight.

How to make cultural differences work for your team

Writing for Fortune, Annie Fisher points out that diversity in your team won’t spark innovation automatically – you have to draw out cultural differences to make them to work.

Advice on discussing pay with employees

Discussing money with employees can be uncomfortable, as Amy Gallo points out, writing for HBR.org. Even if you’re sharing the good news of a bonus or pay rise, it’s difficult to talk about specific numbers when valuing someone’s work, especially if you’re not the one making the decision.

Tips on structuring your startup the right way

Writing for Strategy+Business, Eric J. McNulty discusses the importance of structuring your new company the right way. Drawing inspiration from Derek Lidow’s book Startup Leadership, McNulty offers the following tips:

How managers can break their bad habits

Leaders must learn and practise new management techniques in order to overcome the habits that are holding them back, writes Jean-Francois Manzoni, INSEAD Professor of Management Practice, for Insead Knowledge.

Building your innovation team – the characters you need

As Amina Elahi points out, writing for the Chicago Tribune’s Blue Sky section, innovation doesn’t just happen – it’s created.

How to show your organisation is serious about innovation

You can’t achieve innovation through mission statements or press releases. Many leaders talk about the importance of innovation but are merely paying lip service to the concept.

Developing a strategy and mindset that encourages creative thinking takes concerted effort, observes Lisa Bodell, writing for Strategy+Business.

How to build a culture of quality for your organisation

Quality in business has never mattered more, say Ashwin Srinivasan and Bryan Kurey, writing for Harvard Business Review.

How to emulate extraordinary leaders

To be an extraordinary leader, you need to take care of the little things as well as big things necessary for your people to flourish, writes Geoffrey James of Inc.com.

Having interviewed dozens of very successful CEOs, James suggests eight ways you can emulate them:

CEO tenures: are you sure you’re still the right person for the job?

How long should a CEO stay in the job? This is a question pondered by Manfred F. R. Kets de Vries, writing for the HBR.org Blog Network.

Kets de Vries divides the nature and challenges of the chief executive role into three distinct phases:

How to lead your company out of a crisis

Even good leaders can overlook early signs of trouble, according to Doug Yakola, writing for McKinsey Insights.

Yakola has been running recovery programmes for 20 years as chief restructuring officer or CFO in over a dozen turnaround situations. He has witnessed many managers heading into crisis territory without realising it.

Overcome these obstacles to change

Why is change so hard to achieve when there is such a wealth of information at our fingertips?

Writing for Fast Company, Stephanie Vozza observes that the problem isn’t gathering knowledge needed to make the change; it’s putting the information into action.

Eight traits of destructive employees

Writing for Inc.com, Jeff Haden observes that it isn’t always the truly terrible employees who cause the real problems – it’s the workers who appear to be doing a satisfactory job while slowly destroying the performance, morale and attitude of others.

Haden highlights the traits of “exceptionally destructive” employees:

Stress can help your performance – but only if you learn to control it

Managing your emotions and remaining calm under pressure has a direct link to your performance, according to Travis Bradberry, writing for Forbes.com.

Is there a crisis of trust in leadership?

Trust in business leaders is at an historic low, observes Damien O’Brien, writing for Management Today. He cites the Edelman Trust Barometer, which revealed that in 2013 a mere 18% of respondents said they trusted business leaders to be truthful.

Five ways consultants get it wrong for your business

Every business leader needs help at some time in their career. A view from an outsider can throw a new light on a tricky problem, and the right consultant can mean the difference between success and failure.

How great leaders maintain their composure under intense pressure

Change management requirements, increased marketplace demands and intensifying competitive factors all mean that leaders need to show more composure than ever before in the workplace, writes Glenn Llopis, writing for Forbes.com.

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