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Management

Every good manager knows that people are their most valuable resource. In these articles we show you how to manage effectively to get great things from the people you manage. We'll tell you how to create powerful teams, nurture talent and prevent conflict. All our articles contain the best new business thinking from around the world.

Tips on selecting and trialling new management practices

Adopting a new management practice could give your company competitive edge and boost performance. But, warns Julian Birkinshaw, writing for Harvard Business Review, leaders should beware the “next big thing”.

Want to be an entrepreneur? Here are some things you need to know first

Think you want to be an entrepreneur? Lolly Daskal, writing for Inc.com, reveals what it’s really like to go it alone.

Daskal reveals eight facts about entrepreneurship that you really need to know:

1) You might fail. Almost 90% of startups fail within a few years. You might dream of being the next Amazon.com, but your chances are slim.

How can you be a more effective manager in times of disruption?

On Forbes.com, Chunka Mui highlights some lessons on managing in times of disruption.

The author observes: "One important insight is that, as bosses' responsibilities and compensation grow, they become ever more dependent on people and factors beyond their control.

Communication: avoid these three traps

Ron Ashkenas discusses the difficulty of communication on his HBR.org blog, observing that large organisations in particular struggle in this area.

Planning fallacy: why it always takes longer than you think to get things done

Human beings are generally "pretty lousy" at estimating the time they will need to complete a task, says Heidi Grant Halvorson on Fast Company – and obviously that has implications for managers everywhere.

How to help employees meet their goals

On HBR.org, Amy Gallo looks at ways of making sure your employees succeed in achieving their goals.

What to do when your colleagues are fighting

How should you respond when two of your colleagues are fighting? Amy Gallo explores the protocol and etiquette of conflict management in her article for the HBR Blog Network.

Workplace conflict can be complicated. Sure, if you manage the two co-workers who are fighting, it is your duty to intervene. But if they are your peers, the situation is far less clear cut.

Are you fulfilling your potential as a boss?

Are you a good boss – or a great one? That's the question posed by Linda Hill and Kent Lineback, writing for Harvard Business Review. They observe that most bosses reach a certain level of proficiency and stop there, leaving their potential unfulfilled.

How to assemble a winning top team

On the McKinsey Insights website, Michiel Kruyt, Judy Malan, and Rachel Tuffield discuss the importance of building an effective top team, pointing out that the consequences of getting it wrong could be the paralysis of the entire organisation. With that in mind, they offer some advice for CEOs on assembling a senior executive team.

Want to change your organisation? You need to change yourself first

Efforts to achieve organisational change often falter because executives overlook the need to change themselves, according to Nate Boaz and Erica Ariel Fox, writing for McKinsey Quarterly.

A new strategy will not live up to its potential if it fails to address the underlying capabilities and mindsets of the people who need to execute it, insist the authors.

Getting the most out of your mentoring relationship

The right mentor can make a huge difference to your career, writes Katherine Reynolds Lewis for Fortune.

Lois Zachary, author of The Mentor's Guide: Facilitating Effective Learning Relationships, tells Reynolds Lewis that 96% of executives consider mentoring as an important development tool.

Why the employee engagement survey is out of date

It’s high time we took a fresh approach toward employee engagement, insists Josh Bersin, writing for Forbes.com.

Think your team works best under pressure? Think again

Many managers think they and their teams work best when under pressure. It’s a common belief that we come out fighting when our backs are against the wall, the situation inspiring us to channel our creativity and problem-solving capabilities and produce our best work.

Eight things all great bosses believe

According to Geoffrey James, writing for Inc.com, the best and most respected managers tend to share certain core beliefs.

Seven ways to create a happy workforce

Two thirds of the world's employees feel disengaged in the workplace, write Peter Flade, James Harter and Jim Asplund for the HBR.org Blog Network. But there is a recipe for happy, spirited employees and it has seven essential ingredients.

How to survive a social media crisis

On MIT Sloan Management Review, Gerald C. Kane reports from the 2014 South by Southwest festival where he attended a session entitled Tomorrow Is Another Day: Surviving A Social Media Crisis.

Are you creating problems instead of solving them?

Many people launch startups because the idea of being boss is more appealing than being employee. However, as Suzanne Lucas observes on Inc.com, the problems don’t go away just because you are the boss.

“In fact,” writes Lucas, “there seem to be more – clients, employees, investors, regulations – and sometimes, the biggest problem is you.”

The five hallmarks of effective teams

The process of scaling up excellence in an organisation happens largely through teams, according to Robert Sutton, writing for Fortune – specifically, by growing new teams in the right way and weaving together their efforts across the company.

Mentoring: how to get the balance right

On Fast Company, Art Markman and Lolly Daskal discuss mentoring employees and striking the balance between developing their skills and allowing them to work autonomously.

The three key questions to ask recruitment firms

Writing for Forbes.com, Larry Myler observes that if a recruitment company can’t find, hire, develop and retain an extraordinary workforce for itself, it’s unlikely it will be able to help your company.

Myler suggests three key questions you should ask recruitment firms before choosing one to help build your workforce:

Why you can’t afford to ignore your ‘invisible’ employees

Writing for Harvard Business Review, David Zweig discusses a class of employees he calls “the invisibles”. These are extremely committed professionals capable of successful, high-profile careers but prefer to work away from the spotlight.

How to make cultural differences work for your team

Writing for Fortune, Annie Fisher points out that diversity in your team won’t spark innovation automatically – you have to draw out cultural differences to make them to work.

Advice on discussing pay with employees

Discussing money with employees can be uncomfortable, as Amy Gallo points out, writing for HBR.org. Even if you’re sharing the good news of a bonus or pay rise, it’s difficult to talk about specific numbers when valuing someone’s work, especially if you’re not the one making the decision.

How managers can break their bad habits

Leaders must learn and practise new management techniques in order to overcome the habits that are holding them back, writes Jean-Francois Manzoni, INSEAD Professor of Management Practice, for Insead Knowledge.

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