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Management

Every good manager knows that people are their most valuable resource. In these articles we show you how to manage effectively to get great things from the people you manage. We'll tell you how to create powerful teams, nurture talent and prevent conflict. All our articles contain the best new business thinking from around the world.

Trust: why it’s important and how leaders create it

Creating trust within a business culture is a key foundation of leadership success, observes Nick Bron for Leadership Review.

Employees need to trust their leaders and the decisions they make, and have faith that the organisation is being steered along the right path for all concerned.

The art of selling your ideas to the boss

If you struggle to secure buy-in for your proposals, then it might be time to change your strategy. There are a number of “issue-selling” tactics that will give your ideas traction and secure the resources and attention they deserve.

Four things you should never do when using freelancers

By 2020, over 40% of our workforce will be freelancers – that’s according to a recent study by Intuit.

How can you get the best out of outsourcing? And what are the pitfalls to avoid? John Boitnott, writing for Inc.com, lists four things you should never do when using freelancers:

Want to be a great boss? Don’t do this

Become a great boss by thinking about the kind of boss you would hate to be, advises Avery Augustine, writing for Inc.com, via The Muse.

Being a great boss is a complicated business. It means finding the right balance between constructive criticism and praise, affection and respect, managing and delegating.

Your team holds the key to great leadership

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Leadership is not all about you, write Sucheta Nadkarni and Andreas Richter on the University of Cambridge Judge Business School blog. A strong team makes a great CEO and the most successful leaders look to others for solutions.

How HR can regain its relevance

It’s hard to see the point of HR when business is bad, Peter Cappelli writes for Harvard Business Review. We tend to appreciate what HR does only when business is booming, labour is scarce and retention rates are poor. During economic downturns, HR comes across as a nuisance and a nag.

Leadership lessons from the Navy SEALs

Under pressure you don’t rise to the occasion – you sink to the level of your training. That’s just one of the lessons business coaches can learn from the US Navy SEALs’ training ethic, says Michael Schrage, writing for Harvard Business Review.

Find the sinkholes in your strategy

No strategy is ever perfect, says Ken Favaro, writing for Strategy+Business. But it takes great leadership and confidence to recognise this.

The author poses two questions to help you work out just where your company’s weaknesses lie:

Why leaders make poor decisions

All leaders make poor decisions from time to time. Usually, they are relatively small and insignificant. However, writing for CEO.com, Jack Zenger and Joseph Folkman discuss the bad decisions leaders make that have a “titanic impact”.

Want to be a great leader? Ask for help

The most successful people in business rely on others to do their jobs better, insists Camille Preston, writing for the Fortune website.

Far from being a sign of weakness or a lack of competence, asking for help is something all great leaders do, says the author.

Stop blocking collaboration in your firm

Professionals who collaborate with their colleagues on cross-disciplinary work generate more revenue, inspire greater client loyalty and give their firms competitive edge, says Heidi Gardner in Harvard Business Review.

Five strategy beliefs that are just plain wrong

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We know a great deal about what strategy is, but very little about how to make strategy work, write Donald Sull, Rebecca Homkes and Charles Sull for Harvard Business Review.

Stop worrying about employee engagement

Are we in the midst of an employee engagement crisis? Or have consultants created a problem in order to sell business a solution, asks Nick Bron for Leadership Review.

2013 might have been a watershed year for the concept of “employee engagement”. Gallup published research indicating that only 13% of employees are “engaged” at work.

Ten essential lessons for entrepreneurs

For some entrepreneurs, things seem to fall into place on their rise to financial success, observes Jayson Demers, writing for Entrepreneur.com.

However, in spite of appearances, their success is not down to luck but rather an understanding of the importance of learning, adapting and growing, says the author.

15 quick fixes to improve productivity

Wish there were more hours in a day? Jayson De Mers, writing for Inc.com, reveals fifteen easy ways to boost productivity right now.

1) Go airplane mode. If you want to get things done, close your email and turn off your mobile phone, advises De Mers.

Don’t just lead your industry – dominate it

Competitive advantage is shifting, say Thomas N. Hubbard, Paul Leinwand and Cesare Mainardi, writing for Strategy+Business. The new industry leaders are leaner and more focused than their predecessors. They are the “supercompetitors”.

How to build the perfect board

The perfect board is diverse, well-trained and highly skilled, says Dr Roger Barker of the Institute of Directors.

Writing in Management Today, Barker describes how to build a great board in eight easy steps.

How to connect with your employees

For your company to thrive, you need each and every one of your employees to give their all. So how can you excite your workforce, fill them with enthusiasm and win their commitment?

Peter Economy, writing for Inc.com, reveals seven proven strategies for connecting with your employees:

How to make your employees feel valued

You are failing in your role as a leader if just one of your employees feels undervalued, says Glenn Llopis, writing for Forbes.com.

Seven ways to kill a brainstorming session

The wrong words at the wrong time can bring a brainstorming session to a “screeching halt”, says Sam Harrison, writing for Fast Company. If you want to encourage innovative thinking, never use these seven sentences:

The lessons leaders everywhere can learn from Chinese companies

Chinese companies can teach the West responsiveness, flexibility, improvisation and speed, say Thomas Hout and David Michael, writing for the Harvard Business Review.

Four myths about managing Millennials

Are Millennials really so different at work from Generation Xers and Baby Boomers? Amy Gallo, writing for the HBR Blog Network, says not.

Comparing the research of two academics, Gallo concludes that most of the myths about young people in the workplace are untrue, and that managing Millennials isn’t so difficult.

Using your emotions in negotiations

Learn to use your emotions and you will be a better negotiator, writes Shirli Kopelman for the HBR Blog Network.

Many people fear acknowledging emotions at work, believing they only cloud judgement and impede reasoning. But, argues the author, your emotions can be an important negotiating tool, giving you energy and expression.

Why you need to get marketing and IT to work together – and how to do it

Marketing and IT will need to work better together if they want to generate big revenue from big data.

Big data necessitates a “marriage of convenience” between CMOs and CIOs – both of whom are responsible for turning this new resource into profit, explain Matt Ariker, Martin Harrysson and Jesko Perrey, writing for McKinsey Insights.

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