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Management

Every good manager knows that people are their most valuable resource. In these articles we show you how to manage effectively to get great things from the people you manage. We'll tell you how to create powerful teams, nurture talent and prevent conflict. All our articles contain the best new business thinking from around the world.

Eight things all great bosses believe

According to Geoffrey James, writing for Inc.com, the best and most respected managers tend to share certain core beliefs.

Seven ways to create a happy workforce

Two thirds of the world's employees feel disengaged in the workplace, write Peter Flade, James Harter and Jim Asplund for the HBR.org Blog Network. But there is a recipe for happy, spirited employees and it has seven essential ingredients.

How to survive a social media crisis

On MIT Sloan Management Review, Gerald C. Kane reports from the 2014 South by Southwest festival where he attended a session entitled Tomorrow Is Another Day: Surviving A Social Media Crisis.

Are you creating problems instead of solving them?

Many people launch startups because the idea of being boss is more appealing than being employee. However, as Suzanne Lucas observes on Inc.com, the problems don’t go away just because you are the boss.

“In fact,” writes Lucas, “there seem to be more – clients, employees, investors, regulations – and sometimes, the biggest problem is you.”

The five hallmarks of effective teams

The process of scaling up excellence in an organisation happens largely through teams, according to Robert Sutton, writing for Fortune – specifically, by growing new teams in the right way and weaving together their efforts across the company.

Mentoring: how to get the balance right

On Fast Company, Art Markman and Lolly Daskal discuss mentoring employees and striking the balance between developing their skills and allowing them to work autonomously.

The three key questions to ask recruitment firms

Writing for Forbes.com, Larry Myler observes that if a recruitment company can’t find, hire, develop and retain an extraordinary workforce for itself, it’s unlikely it will be able to help your company.

Myler suggests three key questions you should ask recruitment firms before choosing one to help build your workforce:

Why you can’t afford to ignore your ‘invisible’ employees

Writing for Harvard Business Review, David Zweig discusses a class of employees he calls “the invisibles”. These are extremely committed professionals capable of successful, high-profile careers but prefer to work away from the spotlight.

How to make cultural differences work for your team

Writing for Fortune, Annie Fisher points out that diversity in your team won’t spark innovation automatically – you have to draw out cultural differences to make them to work.

Advice on discussing pay with employees

Discussing money with employees can be uncomfortable, as Amy Gallo points out, writing for HBR.org. Even if you’re sharing the good news of a bonus or pay rise, it’s difficult to talk about specific numbers when valuing someone’s work, especially if you’re not the one making the decision.

How managers can break their bad habits

Leaders must learn and practise new management techniques in order to overcome the habits that are holding them back, writes Jean-Francois Manzoni, INSEAD Professor of Management Practice, for Insead Knowledge.

How to build a culture of quality for your organisation

Quality in business has never mattered more, say Ashwin Srinivasan and Bryan Kurey, writing for Harvard Business Review.

Overcome these obstacles to change

Why is change so hard to achieve when there is such a wealth of information at our fingertips?

Writing for Fast Company, Stephanie Vozza observes that the problem isn’t gathering knowledge needed to make the change; it’s putting the information into action.

Cut out unnecessary days off sick among your employees

Recent statistics show that the UK loses 131 million days a year to sickness in the workforce. The main reason for this absenteeism is minor illness – such as back, neck and muscle pain.

Eight traits of destructive employees

Writing for Inc.com, Jeff Haden observes that it isn’t always the truly terrible employees who cause the real problems – it’s the workers who appear to be doing a satisfactory job while slowly destroying the performance, morale and attitude of others.

Haden highlights the traits of “exceptionally destructive” employees:

Five ways consultants get it wrong for your business

Every business leader needs help at some time in their career. A view from an outsider can throw a new light on a tricky problem, and the right consultant can mean the difference between success and failure.

How to transform your employees into smart risk takers

Business leaders strive for positive cultural change and innovation, resulting in happy, fulfilled employees creating value throughout the organisation. Writing for Strategy+Business, Lisa Bodell observes that “the journey is just as critical as the destination” when a culture is being reshaped.

Are you a family-friendly manager?

According to Scott Behson, writing for the HBR.org Blog Network, many managers believe in giving more employees the flexibility to balance their needs and responsibilities at home while minimising disruption of the workplace.

How to unblock your creativity

Writing for Entrepreneur.com, Lindsay Broder notes that cultivating client relationship and overcoming obstacles requires “tons of creativity”. But business leaders often find themselves in a creative slump.

With that in mind, Broder offers some simple strategies for overcoming creativity blocks:

• Reaquaint yourself with your mission statement.

You want big data? Maybe you have enough data already

Big data has been hyped to such an extent that companies now expect it to deliver more than it actually can, according to Jeanne W. Ross, Cynthia M. Beath and Anne Quaadgras, writing for Harvard Business Review.

Productivity on the slide? Here’s what to do

Writing for Management Today, John Spencer points out one of the economic puzzles of recent years: the decline in the rate of productivity growth.

Spencer observes that a feature of previous recessions was the rise in productivity per worker coupled with the growth of unemployment.

Five management skills you can’t do without

When you’ve been in the workforce for a certain amount of time, you realise the importance of skills and abilities that simply can’t be learned in business school, observes Katherine Reynolds Lewis, writing for Fortune. With that in mind, the author highlights five key – but neglected – skills for management success...

Five guidelines for new chief executives

Writing for the HBR.org Blog Network, Roger Martin, Dean of the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto in Canada, reveals that an executive on the verge of promotion to head a large global company recently approached him for advice on how to be effective as a new CEO. Martin offered the executive five recommendations.

Are you leading your employees or obstructing them?

Are you your employees’ worst enemy? That’s the question posed by Kannan Ramaswamy and William Youngdahl, writing for Strategy+Business. The authors insist that many leaders are inadvertently an obstacle to superior performance.

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