You are here

How great leaders maintain their composure under intense pressure

Change management requirements, increased marketplace demands and intensifying competitive factors all mean that leaders need to show more composure than ever before in the workplace, writes Glenn Llopis, writing for Forbes.com.

Leaders must avoid showing signs of immaturity or being unprepared, insists the author. To help them, Llopis presents seven ways to maintain composure during high-pressure situations:

1) Don’t let your emotions get in the way. Strong-willed leaders are able to keep their cool while still managing to get their points across and express their concern and care. There is no need to shout of get overly animated.

2) Don’t take things personally. Leaders shouldn’t get defensive and feel they must always justify their thinking and actions, insists Llopis. The noise and politics surrounding them should not affect their decision-making capabilities.

3) Maintain a positive mental attitude. Employees keep a close watch on their leader’s actions, behaviour and general demeanour. It is therefore essential that leaders stay upbeat and transmit their positivity to the people around them. It is important to set the right tone and keep things moving forward.

4) Remain fearless. Llopis comments: “Faced with adversity several times over, your fears will eventually vanish and uncertainty will become your best friend.”

5) Respond decisively. Speak with conviction, authority and confidence – even if you’re uncertain of the outcomes you might be facing. Employees will work better if they sense you have everything under control.

6) Be accountable. When faced with crisis or change, fully commit to resolving the issue at hand. Take responsibility for the decision you have made, staying calm and not blaming others if things don’t go to plan.

7) Act like you’ve seen it before. Llopis observes that great leaders “show they have been through the problem solving process numerous times before”. He urges leaders to be patient, active listeners who take a compassionate approach.

Source
Greg Llopis