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Management

Every good manager knows that people are their most valuable resource. In these articles we show you how to manage effectively to get great things from the people you manage. We'll tell you how to create powerful teams, nurture talent and prevent conflict. All our articles contain the best new business thinking from around the world.

Revealed: the four qualities all great teams have in common

Many years of research have highlighted four essential qualities of great teams, say Adrian Gostick and Chester Elton on Forbes.com.

The new approach to IT management

On the McKinsey Quarterly website, Roger Roberts, Hugo Sarrazin and Johnson Sikes explore a new model for managing IT which combines factory-style productivity to keep costs down with a more nimble, innovation-focused approach to adapt to rapid change.

Why avoiding conflict can make it harder to get buy-in for your idea

On his HBR.org blog, John Kotter puts forward the theory that conflict can actually help in getting an idea accepted.

This will come as a surprise to leaders who put such a high value on consensus that they feel an urge to complete agreement on everything.

Why there's no such thing as multitasking

On the HBR.org blog, Paul Atchley insists we can't multitask, so we should stop trying.

Atchley points out that although we feel productive when trying to juggle lots of different tasks, in reality that kind of behaviour makes us less effective in our work.

Stop procrastinating and get on with it

Susan Adams of Forbes.com asks, "Do you keep putting off things you should be getting behind you?" If so, she reveals some tips on how you can stop procrastinating.

Dealing with passive-aggressive colleagues

Amy Jen Su and Muriel Maignan Wilkins use HBR.org's blog to offer advice on dealing with passive-aggressive peers in the workplace.

They use the following example to describe the paradoxical term "passive aggression", which they say is all too often loosely used to describe co-workers:

Responsibility and reward: how to judge whether your employees are ready

On the HBR.org 'Best Practices' blog, Amy Gallo outlines when you should reward employees with more responsibility and money.

Gallo observes: "Managers who want to recognise employees for good work have many tools at their disposal. One of the more traditional ways to reward a top performer is to give them a promotion or raise or both."

Why micro-managers get better results

Since Steve Jobs died it has become clear that Apple misses not only his innovative thinking but also his micro-management.

Are you guilty of these management lies?

How truthful are you with your employees or direct reports? Although management requires a certain level of discretion, there’s a fine line between being discreet and being deceptive.

How to overcome the cynics on your management team

Are you constantly battling cynicism on your team? Are your plans and suggestions often met by negative comments from the same naysayers?

If so, Management Today provides a handy guide to preventing the cynics from infecting your team.

Expert advice for boards and directors during the financial crisis

The difficult question of how boards should deal with the financial crisis is discussed by top consultants Ram Charan and Tom Neff via an interview by Geoff Colvin at Fortune.

Are you a stupid manager? Take the test now

The underlying thought of the KISS principle (Keep It Simple Stupid) is that, because managers are none too bright, the greater the complexity, the more likely they are to make a mess of their management.

Mastering complexity in management

Do you feel that your work as a manager is getting more and more complicated? You are almost certainly right.

The benefits of flexible working

Growing numbers of employees want to work more flexibly in order to achieve a better balance between their jobs and the rest of their lives. But while growing numbers of organisations are trying to accommodate their employees’ requests, they are doing it not out of altruism but for good business reasons.

The Drucker legacy

Few managers today can have escaped exposure to the management industry. They have very likely been taught some aspect of management, been exposed to some new (or once new) management idea, worked alongside expensive management consultants, come across an interesting article in a management journal, even read a whole management book (even if it’s only The One-Minute Manager).

Is your business management philosophy built on flawed judgment?

Interesting evidence about predictions is covered in a book by Philip Tetlock entitled Expert Political Judgment: How good is it? The answer is directly relevant to business management, because fortunes are directly affected by political decisions (and indecisions).

How long can you wait for the benefits of change management or innovation?

If the benefits of a new idea will start to come through in six years’ time, and the full benefits in 20 years, is that idea likely to be implemented?

How to be a maverick... and win

‘Mavericks’ are by definition rare beasts in business management or any other organised activity.

Flawed leadership styles and how to avoid them

Why do business idols, both individuals and firms, develop feet of clay? For anybody who believes this cannot happen to their leader, or their organisation, or even to themselves, the best advice is ‘don’t be so sure’.

Human resource management: going back to basics

Human resource management, like all aspects of business, is subject to fads and fashions which seem so important when they are launched but soon disappear into the fog. Among the most popular at present are coaching and mentoring, employee engagement and HR shared services provision.

How to run incentive schemes that really work

The corporate goal of every organisation is to survive, so goes the famous mantra from business guru Tom Peters.

Profits from the lean business model

When the CEO of the mighty Wal-Mart asks the UK government for protection from competition from Tesco, one fifth its size, it is clear something significant is going on. The rise of Tesco is not explained by its being better at dominating its home trade than Wal-Mart in the markets it serves in the US. Both benefit from enormous scale and purchasing power.

The brains of leadership and management

Management and leadership alike obviously and entirely depend on the brain - the most complex organ in the human body and one that, even today, is not fully understood. The better leaders and managers do understand its workings, however, the better they are able to use this complexity – and improve their results.

The two gifts every good manager should give his staff

Great coaches no doubt differ in their styles as much as great athletes. But the coaches must all have eone thing in common: they are great communicators. It isn't just a question of seeing what the athlete must do, but of persuading the athlete to do it.

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